Showing: 1 - 1 of 1 RESULTS

Grading will be according to the following rubric:. Grade 7 - Forces and Structures. Final Project. Cool Architecture Links! This will be don e in groups of students. Research architecture around the world. You will d esign and build your own structure using elements from specific buildings. As a class we will agree upon one force to test each structure eg. Develop and demonstrate ways to test potential forces wind, earthquake, etc to show the class the strength of your structure. Accompanied will be a one page report describing the elements you used and why you used them.

Tech Rubric. Videos Assignments Cool Architecture Links! Final Project This will be don e in groups of students. Requirements: Your Structure - over two feet in len gth or height Drawing of your structure using a scale Be able to withstand class test Develop a struc tur al test 1 page report - Name your structure. E xplain what architecture elements you are incorporating and why.

Des cr i be your structural tests. Grading will be according to the following rubric: Tech Rubric.Although no charge or fee is required for using TeachEngineering curricular materials in your classroom, the lessons and activities often require material supplies. The expendable cost is the estimated cost of supplies needed for each group of students involved in the activity. Most curricular materials in TeachEngineering are hierarchically organized; i.

Some activities or lessons, however, were developed to stand alone, and hence, they might not conform to this strict hierarchy. Related Curriculum shows how the document you are currently viewing fits into this hierarchy of curricular materials. Students demonstrate their knowledge of compression, tension and torsion by conducting the experiment and successfully answering follow-up questions.

Each TeachEngineering lesson or activity is correlated to one or more K science, technology, engineering or math STEM educational standards.

In the ASN, standards are hierarchically structured: first by source; e. View aligned curriculum. Do you agree with this alignment? Thanks for your feedback! Students are introduced to the five fundamental loads: compression, tension, shear, bending and torsion.

They learn about the different kinds of stress each force exerts on objects. To introduce the two types of stress that materials undergo — compression and tension — students examine compressive and tensile forces and learn about bridges and skyscrapers. They construct their own building structure using marshmallows and spaghetti to see which structure can hold the most weigh Students learn about torsion as a force acting upon structures and have the opportunity to design something to withstand this force.

Through a series of three lessons, each with its own hands-on activity, students are introduced to 1 forces, loads and stress, 2 tensile loads and failure, and 3 torsion on structures—fundamental physics concepts that are critical to understanding the built world. The associated activities engage When structures are being built, engineers must be aware of the forces that will be acting on the structure so they can make appropriate design and materials decisions.

In today's activity, we will investigate those forces and how they might affect a structural member a glue stick. Assign the Investigating Questions as homework or a quiz. Or conduct a class discussion.

Quick Links

Refer to associated lesson for background information on forces. Why Teach Engineering in K? Find more at TeachEngineering. Quick Look. Activity dependency indicates that this activity relies upon the contents of the TeachEngineering document s listed. Print this activity. Curriculum in this Unit Most curricular materials in TeachEngineering are hierarchically organized; i.

Subscribe to our newsletter.Solid structures are solid through and through even though it may have some gaps and small holes in it. The majority of its structure is solid. A dam for example may have service tunnels and electrical lines running through it, but is otherwise solid. Solid structures have the advantage of being simple in design and generally do not require as much training to build except for the use of special building materials.

They are, however, heavier and use more material compared to other types of structures. Examples are dams, main support colums, foundations etc…. Shell structures are mostly hollow, but have a solid outer skin. Their primary use is as containers and for protection often both. Shell structures can be remarkably strong and use way less material than solid structures. However, they require more knowledge to build. Examples are: Domes, bowls, barrels, our skull, nuts and eggs.

Frame structures are made of many individual parts that are connected to each other in complex ways. The key to strong and useful frame structures is the specific way that parts are attached and the manner in which they are attached. Frame structures are more flexible than other comparable structures made from the same material. They usually require greater knowledge and skill to assemble, causing greater construction cost, but use significantly less material.

They are the most sophisticated of structures. Examples are the framing of houses and buildings, our skeleton, spiderwebs and the internal structure of bones. Many structures are combinations of two or all three types of structures. A house, for example, has a solid foundation, frame walls and roof trusses and is covered by flat sheets of wood and drywall, making it a large shell structure.

A force is a push or a pull. Forces act on all structures, big or small, and the structure must be able to withstand the forces. Structures experience both internal as well as external forces. External forces act from the outside, like wind blowing on a house wall, while internal forces act from the inside of the structure, like the tension in a tendon or ligament that holds a joint together. For example, I could try to find out what the length of a piece of wood is.

The answer is a simple number, like 24 cm. They are fully described by a magnitude alone. Forces, on the other hand, have both a magnitude and a directionality. A force pushing left will have a dramatically different effect to one pushing right, even if they have the very same strength magnitude. The direction in which the force is acting is an essential part in fully describing it.

In terms of what a force will do to a structure, there is even more to a force. Most unfortunately, magnitude is often represented by the thickness of an arrow in drawings even in the odd textbook.

This is really bad practice and you should not adopt it. This is a third aspect of a force that applies when we consider the effect of forces on structures. Consider a lever, for example.

Where we push on a lever determines the mechanical advantage the lever will produce for us. We instinctively will slide back on a lever if we find it too hard to use it.

That changes the point of application while keeping everything else the same.This 6 page building structures project adheres to the Ontario curriculum standards for Grade 7 Science, more specifically 'Form and Function" under "Understanding Structures and Mechanisms. In this activity, students will design and build a structure that shows the knowledge they've gained so far.

Page 1: clear, concise introduction to the project; structure requirements stated i. Pages 2, 4, 5 - these pages consist of the written portion of the building assignment; in this write-up section, students will answer regarding their structures, such as what materials were used, what design they chose use of certain shapes, mechanisms, buttresses, creating strength and stability ; students will also be asked to discuss the forces and loads affecting their structure; lastly, students will have an opportunity to reflect on what they could have improved on.

Page 3 - students will provide a large sketch of their structure that clearly shows all of the parts and details; here, students will also be asked to specifically label certain key aspects of their structures e.

This product can also be modified to suit the various needs e.

grade 7 structures and forces project

IEP modifications, accommodations, etc. Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter? All Categories. Grade Level. Resource Type. Log In Join Us. View Wish List View Cart. ScienceBasic PrinciplesEngineering. Grade Levels.

ProjectsActivitiesAssessment. File Type. Word Document File. Product Description. This project outline is formatted as follows: Page 1: clear, concise introduction to the project; structure requirements stated i.

Pages 2, 4, 5 - these pages consist of the written portion of the building assignment; in this write-up section, students will answer regarding their structures, such as what materials were used, what design they chose use of certain shapes, mechanisms, buttresses, creating strength and stability ; students will also be asked to discuss the forces and loads affecting their structure; lastly, students will have an opportunity to reflect on what they could have improved on Page 3 - students will provide a large sketch of their structure that clearly shows all of the parts and details; here, students will also be asked to specifically label certain key aspects of their structures e.

Total Pages. Report this Resource to TpT. Reported resources will be reviewed by our team. Add one to cart. Buy licenses to share. Add to Wish List. Share this resource. Elizabeth A Followers. Keep in Touch! Sign Up.The chance to explore concepts up close, making discoveries and a few messes! This round-up includes 7th grade science experiments from a variety of STEM fields: biology, earth science, physics, engineering, and much more.

Pick a few to try with your middle schoolers soon! Climate change can be a contentious topic, so start by teaching kids about the greenhouse effect, which is easy to see and understand. Then, urge them to explore data collected by other scientists so they can learn to make informed decisions about topics like global warming. Learn more: Teaching Science With Lynda. This is a great individual or group 7th grade science project, as it encourages students to use and hone their design and engineering skills to make a working model of a hand.

Learn more: Science Buddies. Plenty of homes use water filtration systems these days, but how do they really work? This chemistry experiment explores how charcoal filters impurities from drinking water. Learn more: The Homeschool Scientist. The supplies are simple, but the results are pretty neat!

Teach kids about acids and bases without needing PH test strips! Simply boil some red cabbage and have students use the resulting water to test various substances—acids turn red, and bases turn green. Learn more: Education Possible. The calcium content of eggshells makes them a great stand-in for teeth.

In this experiment, students use eggs to determine how soda and juice stain the teeth and wear down the enamel. Bonus: Have students try different toothpaste and toothbrush combinations to see how effective they are.

Learn more: Feels Like Home. This simple but effective DIY science project teaches kids about air pressure and meteorology. Learn more: Edventures With Kids. Students experiment with the best way to build a solar oven, exploring thermal energy, reflection, convection, and other physics concepts. They can serve up their experiment results along with their final reports! We learn early on that oil floats on water, but where do other liquids fit in?

Students find out when they conduct this colorful density experiment that has them layer different substances, making a rainbow. Learn more: ThoughtCo.In this strand, students will identify and describe forces acting on and within structures.

As they measure and compare external forces natural or human acting on structures and their effects on different materials, they will develop a more sophisticated understanding of the concept of force and of ways in which structures respond to forces acting upon them. Students will have an opportunity to apply their learning as they design and build structures or mechanisms. By examining the effects of forces from natural phenomena on society and the environment, students will gain respect for the power behind these forces and appreciation for the devastating effects that they have on the natural and built environment, and they will be able to develop strategies for keeping themselves and others safe during these events.

Big Ideas: - Structures and mechanisms throughout our environment have forces that act on and within them.

grade 7 structures and forces project

This information can be used to guide the design of new structures and mechanisms. Overview of the Unit: By the end of the unit, students will be able to: 1. Analyse social and environmental impacts of forces acting on structures and mechanisms; 2. Investigate forces that act on structures and mechanisms; 3.

Identify forces that act on and within structures and mechanisms, and describe the effects of these forces on structures and mechanisms. Graphic Dictionary of Forces Concepts 2. Forces lab 3. Applets to teach Forces, Loads, Materials, and Shapes 2. Simple Machines Review 4.

Tools that Rely on Simple Machines. Unit 2: Understanding Structures and Mechanisms - Forces Acting on Structures and Mechanisms In this strand, students will identify and describe forces acting on and within structures.Right now, you are sitting at a desk on a chair.

Soon, you will write things in a book with a pen or a pencil. The book rests on your desk. All these objects are called structures. If you look around the classroom, you will see many other structures. For example, the classroom and the school buildings are structures. In this chapter, you will learn about natural and man-made structures. You will also learn about shell structures, solid structures and frame structures. Look around you in the classroom. Choose any object, for example a cupboard, a table, a chair, a basket, a bottle, a shoe, a pencil case or a brick.

Then answer the following questions about this object. Can it be used to keep certain things in one place, so that they do not lie around all over the classroom? Can it be used to protect something, for example to protect it from sunlight or wind? This man is sitting comfortably on the chair. You can say that the chair supports the man and keeps him from falling off. Describe two other objects that are different from chairs, but are also used to support something or someone.

A bridge that crosses a stream or a river from one end to the other helps people to cross it without getting wet.

grade 7 structures and forces project

You can say that the bridge spans the stream. Suppose you want to set up a stall at a market to sell food such as sugar, flour, maize, rice, eggs, beans and cooking oil.

Playground Project - Grade 7 Science and Math

So you buy one large bag each of sugar, flour, maize and rice, and a litre drum of cooking oil. Make a list of the things you can see in this picture. What else do you need to set up your stall before you can sell the goods? Why are eggs packed in special containers such as the one you see in this picture? If you wanted to make a table from the two empty crates, what else would you need? Suppose a woman wants to buy 2 kg of flour from you.

grade 7 structures and forces project

Will you ask her to hold out her hands so that you can put the flour in her hands, or will you make another plan? What will you use as containers when you sell maize, rice, sugar and flour to people? A container is something that you use to keep things together in one place, like a paper bag for rice. What did you decide to use to span the two crates to form a table, when you answered question 5 above?

Classifying Structures

The table you will make, the crates that you use to make the table, the containers in which you get the eggs and the plastic bottles in which you sell the oil are all called structures.